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Prepare for Rush Week

Know the Terminology

Societies

Societies are simply undergraduate student-run groups that give you opportunities to meet people and get involved in outreaches, discipleship and events like intramural sports, debate and a scholastic trivia competition. View a full list of men’s societies and women’s societies.

Society Rush

Rush was named for the flurry of activity around campus. Everywhere you go there are people who want to feed you, talk with you and let you know why their society is the greatest ever. The key is to keep from making promises early on; explore all your options and make the societies fight over you all week until induction. You’ll get a better feel for the personality of each society and be better able to choose the right one for you.

Society Induction

As a new student you’ll meet in the Davis Field House on Saturday night for induction, where you’ll choose your society. As each society representative—the runner—crosses the court, you’ll be able to follow that society out of the building. They’ll lead you to where the society is waiting to welcome you in their induction party.

Closed Society

Occasionally certain societies are not available to join for day students and residence hall students who live in the area (unless they plan on staying in a residence hall until their senior year). However, you can join if one of your siblings or your parent was or currently is a member.

Society Decision Slip

Prior to Induction you’ll get a society decision slip in your campus post office box. Take this with you to the DFH on Saturday night. Mark the society you’re choosing on your slip and turn it in to the president of your new society.

Society Meetings

Most Fridays you’ll meet with the other members of your society in your society room. It’ll give you time to catch up with them, fellowship, have fun and organize society projects.

Scholastic Bowl

The intramural Scholastic Bowl competition (you’ll probably hear it called the “Schol Bowl”) is similar to a Bible quiz in that contestants use a buzzer system to determine who gets to try to answer each question. Points are given for correct answers and deducted for incorrect answers. Questions are based on general knowledge, the Bible or specialized knowledge from fields like art, music, history and math. Each society has a Scholastic Bowl team and competes against other societies, with the championship competition held at the end of the school year.

Sports

Each society belongs to one of the two leagues (National and American) and one of the two divisions in each league (upper and lower). Sports include soccer, basketball, volleyball, badminton, softball, and more.

Outreach

Societies are great ways to get involved in and serve the community. Bible clubs, jail ministries and hospital visits are just a few example of what’s available.

Stag/Dating Outing

Outings give you great opportunities to develop relationships within and outside your society. Every semester your society will schedule one outing or the other. Stag outings are for your society members only.

Brother/Sister Society

Each men’s society is linked to a women’s society in order to give you more opportunities to develop relationships and partner in prayer, fellowship and service projects.

Spring Rush Schedule

Tuesday, Jan. 13

9:45–10:15 p.m.

Society prayer meetings: you can attend any society of your gender. Check campus bulletin boards or campus intranet for locations.

Wednesday, Jan. 14

8–9 p.m.

Meet society officers to learn of opportunities for involvement. Rodeheaver Auditorium Lobby

Friday, Jan. 16

11 a.m.

Society Meetings: you can attend any society of your gender. Check campus bulletin boards or online for locations.

Tuesday, Jan. 20

9:45–10:15 p.m.

Society prayer meetings: you can attend any society of your gender. Check campus bulletin boards or campus intranet for locations.

Friday, Jan. 23

11 a.m.

Society Meetings: you can attend any society of your gender. Check campus bulletin boards or online for locations.

12–5 p.m.

New undergraduate students not enrolled I Semester will choose a society. Bring society decision slip (received in P.O. Box) to the Center for Leadership Development by 5 p.m. today. The Center for Leadership Development is located in the Activities and Organizations Office in the Student Center.

Fall Rush Schedule

Tuesday, Sept. 1

9:45–10:15 p.m.

Society prayer meetings: you can attend any society of your gender. Check campus bulletin boards or campus intranet for locations.

Friday, Sept. 4

11 a.m.

Society Meetings: you can attend any society of your gender. Check campus bulletin boards or online for locations.

Tuesday, Sept. 8

9:45–10:15 p.m.

Society prayer meetings: you can attend any society of your gender. Check campus bulletin boards or campus intranet for locations.

Friday, Sept. 11

11 a.m.

Society Meetings: you can attend any society of your gender. Check campus bulletin boards or online for locations.

7–10 p.m.

Society booths are open.

Saturday, Sept. 12

Noon

Society Rush ends.

7–8:30 p.m.

Society Induction: You’ll join a society of your gender (Alumni Stadium).

Consider carefully

  • Ask God for direction.
  • Talk to lots of people and ask a lot of questions.
  • Take time to consider:
    • Look for a society that seeks to please the Lord in everything. Talk to the society president, vice president, other officers and members. Find out what they are doing to please the Lord.
    • Find a society in which you can get involved. For example, if you are into sports, find a society that needs you. Or if you want to develop your leadership skills, join a smaller society.
    • Join a society where you can make new friends. Let your BJU experience push you beyond your comfort zone.

Ask the right questions

  • What does your society look for in new members?
  • How does your society encourage spiritual growth?
  • What outreach opportunities does your society offer?
  • How does your society focus on service?
  • How can I get involved in your society?
  • What is your society’s reputation?
  • How will your society develop me?
  • What are your society’s greatest strengths, weaknesses and needs?
  • What are your society’s purpose statement and goals?
  • What two other societies would you recommend? Why?
  • What two other societies would you recommend I avoid? Why?
  • How does your society show its spirit?
  • What are your society’s traditions?
  • What makes your society unique?