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Academic Resource Center

The Academic Resource Center exists to support you on your academic journey at BJU. Whether it’s through one-on-one help at the Writing Center or through a peer study group for a specific class, we’re committed to providing the tools you need to get the most out of your education. Just stop by and talk to one of our friendly, professional staff members to learn more!

Services we offer

Academic Accommodations

If you have a documented disability, our Academic Accommodations supervisor will help you determine the individualized accommodations you need for success.

Transition Advising

Trying to figure out what program you should be in? Our transition advisor is here to help you evaluate your interests and strengths, choose a program that fits you, and then lay out a plan for timely graduation.

Writing Center

Need help with that research paper or literary analysis? Stop by the Writing Center to get one-on-one guidance as you work your way through the writing process.

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Academic Coaching

Meet regularly with one of our academic coaches to strengthen your skills in time management, test taking, note taking, organization and goal setting. Also, discover how to maximize your study time according to your preferred learning style, and create an academic action plan to guide your progress throughout the semester.

The Academic Resource Center also coordinates peer-led study groups and tutoring services, offers technological assistance for both personal computers and instructional equipment, and provides a secure testing service for test taking outside the classroom.

If you would like detailed information about the individual services the Academic Resource Center offers, please visit our website (BJU login required).

Academic Resource Center

Academic Accommodations

Qualifying for academic accommodations

Qualifying students are those who have conditions that interfere with any of the following major life activities—reading, writing, listening, thinking, speaking, hearing, walking, etc.

Specific examples of verifiable disabilities include the following:

  • Learning disability
  • ADD/ADHD
  • Physical, visual or hearing impairments
  • Autism/Asperger’s syndrome
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder
  • Traumatic brain injury
  • Other documented health impairments

Examples of reasonable accommodations and other helps available

  • Academic coaches
  • Audio or large-print text
  • Copies of notes or PowerPoint
  • Extended test time
  • Paid tutors
  • Recording lectures
  • Separate room/reduced distraction testing
  • Study groups
  • Test readers/interpreters
  • Writing Center

What are the steps for requesting accommodations?

  1. Obtain official documentation (details explained below). If documentation already exists, ensure that it is not older than five years.
  2. Meet with the supervisor of Academic Accommodations to discuss the documentation, specific learning and support needs, and what has been successful in the past. Together with the student, the supervisor will determine what current accommodations would give the student the best access to both academic and non-academic activities on the campus.
  3. Provide the necessary information to faculty and/or staff, via a letter prepared by the Academic Accommodations office.

What does the documentation process involve?

ADHD/ADD, learning disabilities, speech/language disorders or traumatic brain injury require an assessment completed by either a licensed school psychologist, educational psychologist, neurologist or other certified diagnostician. The documentation should include:

  • Listing of the assessment measures used to evaluate
  • Statement identifying the disability
  • Clear statement of current functional limitations
  • Description of whether the disability will remain the same or change in any way
  • Description of present and/or past services, accommodations and medications used to help compensate for the limitation to promote academic success (if any)
  • Recommendations for appropriate postsecondary accommodations, adaptive devices, assistive services, etc., that are directly linked to the functional limitations resulting from the specified disability

Hearing impairment, visual impairment, emotional/behavior disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder or other health impairments require an official letter from a qualified physician documenting the specific impairment. The documentation should include:

  • Statement identifying the disability
  • Clear statement of current functional limitations that would impact one or more major life activities
  • Description of whether the disability will remain the same or change in any way
  • Description of present and/or past services, accommodations and medications used to help compensate for the limitation to promote academic success
  • Recommendations for appropriate postsecondary accommodations, adaptive devices, assistive services, etc., that are directly linked to the functional limitations resulting from the specified disability

A Summary of Performance (SOP) may also be included in addition to the assessment or physician’s letter. You may find the national SOP template on Learning Disabilities Association of America or on National Secondary Transition Technical Assistance Center.