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Engineering - Program Student Outcomes

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In preparing students to meet the stated goals, the program is designed to equip them with the following specific competencies:

1.
Knowledge. The ability to apply a core of knowledge necessary to engineering practice. This includes
1.1
Knowledge of mathematics.
1.2
Knowledge of science.
1.3
Core engineering knowledge.
1.4
Knowledge in an engineering specialty.
1.4.1
Computer: Write object-oriented software solutions to real-world problems
1.4.2
Computer: Design interfaces between microprocessors and common I/O devices
1.4.3
Electrical: Design and build board-level electronic circuits
1.4.4
Electrical: Analyze and design electrical systems involving machines and transformers
1.4.5
Mechanical: Apply engineering mechanics, materials, and manufacturing to the design and analysis of mechanical systems.
1.4.6
Mechanical: Apply thermodynamics to solve problems of phase change and heat transfer.
1.4.7
Civil: Analyze and design concrete, steel, and wood structures under realistic constraints
1.4.8
Civil: Design solutions to utilize natural resources effectively and minimize the impact of pollution.
1.5
Knowledge of contemporary issues in engineering.
2.
Experimental Skills. The ability to perform experiments and properly use the results. The graduate
2.1
Can design and conduct experiments.
2.2
Can analyze, interpret, and judge the significance of data.
3.
Technical Skills. The ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice. The graduate
3.1
Has ability to use appropriate techniques for analysis and design.
3.2
Has skill in using modern engineering tools.
3.3
Has ability to use modern engineering software.
4.
Design Skills. The skills necessary to perform engineering design. The graduate
4.1
Can identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.
4.2
Can design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints.
5.
Workplace Skills. The skills necessary to function in the engineering workplace. The graduate
5.1
Functions effectively on multi-disciplinary teams, recognizing the value of other viewpoints.
5.2
Communicates effectively in oral, written, and visual forms.
6.
Character. The personal traits and attitudes that enable a person to pursue a life of Christlike character. The graduate
6.1
Has the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in their global, economic, environmental, and societal contexts.
6.2
Understands professional and ethical responsibility.
6.3
Views all of life including engineering from a consistent biblical worldview.
6.4
Displays a teachable disposition with a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning.

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